IonMesquite

Music and money

Symphony violinist, Mesquite woman square off over instrument

STAFF REPORT

Published on Wednesday, 23 January 2013 05:51

 

1aviolinDALLAS – A Mesquite woman found herself in a Dallas County court this week as she and a prominent musician with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra squabbled over a rare violin crafted by one of the world’s most famous instrument-makers.

According to Courthouse News Service, DSO violinist Filip Fenrych of Dallas is suing Tara Moore of Mesquite over the value of a violin purportedly made by 19th-century Italian violin-maker Stefano Scarampella, whose instruments are sought by collectors and musicians alike.

Moore, the widow of former DSO associate concertmaster Ronald William Hudson, first asked $90,000 for the violin in 2011 but, unable to authenticate it as a true Scarampella, agreed to sell it to Fenrych in 2012 for $47,000. Ronald William Hudson served as associate concertmaster for nearly 30 years and played the violin with several North Texas chamber groups.

Fenrych said that three months later, however, Moore wanted out of the deal, claiming she had found documentation authenticating the violin, and demanded the original price of $90,000, according to CNS. Fenrych said the purchase agreement did not provide for authenticating the violin after sale.

Fenrych, according to court papers, offered to wait before purchasing the violin so Moore could continue to attempt to have it authenticated but Moore refused, saying she was “tired of dealing with it, had sent the violin to too many places, and was not going to do it anymore.”


According to CNS, on Dec. 23 of last year, Moore's attorney contacted Fenrych, forwarding a draft petition that “makes scurrilous allegations about Fenrych and his wife (who had no involvement in the violin purchase) and threatening 'expensive public litigation' if Fenrych did not either remit an additional $43,000 to Moore or immediately return the violin and bow for a refund.”

Fenrych has refused and wants a court declaration that the contract for $47,000 is valid.